Ideen und Prognosen für XRP / Bitcoin — BITSTAMP:XRPBTC ...

Fiat Currency to Cryptocurrency Calculator. Real-time rates from multiple exchanges.

Hey,
Developed a small project that helps you calculate the equivalent amount from fiat money to cryptocurrencies and vice-versa.
Website - Pingrates ( https://pingrates.herokuapp.com/ )
Currently, it supports five cryptocurrencies. Looking to add more later on.
Primarily it supports three fiat currencies and many more by using appropriate exchange rates. For all other currencies rates are calculated using USD Rates and Coinbase Forex rates.
Currently, it provides live rates from three Exchanges. Working on adding more soon!
Notification Alerts
For Desktop user's Notification Alerts are provided which will be delivered using Web Notifications. Just Allow Notifications in Browser and you will receive small popups whenever the conditions are met.
If you have any issues, queries, or find any bugs please comment down or contact me on the E-mail ID provided on the website.
submitted by dev_46 to CryptoCurrencyTrading [link] [comments]

How to Trade Crypto on Bitstamp?

How to Trade Crypto on Bitstamp?
https://preview.redd.it/by5j424h4dc51.jpg?width=2400&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=b084e6a4304bec8990454f3a80da0732fd62040b
Cryptocurrencies are making their way into the mainstream market. These have global acceptance now, with around 5000 cryptocurrencies circulating in the market, there is a growing interest of people in investing in cryptocurrencies. If you too are interested in this, then this blog is going to give you all the necessary information. As a cryptocurrencies stalwart, you would know that certain platforms allow Bitcoin exchange and trading. In this blog, we are going to discuss Bitstamp, which is a renowned cryptocurrencies trading platform. Let’s explore more about this.
Bitstamp Overview:
Before you go ahead and explore how to trade on Bitstamp, it becomes essential for you to know about Bitstamp. Whether you choose this platform or any other cryptocurrency exchange platform, it is important to know about it and how does it work.
Bitstamp is a Bitcoin exchange platform which is based in Luxembourg. The platform enables exchange between USD and Bitcoin. It also allows the exchange of XRP, Ethereum, Bitcoin, Litecoin, USD and EUR cash deposits, and withdrawal. This company accepts fiat money deposits via the European Union’s Single Euro Payment Area.
Bitstamp is one of the trusted platforms for Bitcoin exchange. It offers API to its client so that they can customize the software to access their accounts.
How to Trade Bitcoin on Bitstamp?
Before you start using Bitstamp, you must register yourself on the website. The following steps are going to help you with the same:
· Start by going to the official website of Bitstamp and register or click on this link Start by heading over to bitstamp.net/account/register.
· Here you need to fill information like your name, email ID, Country, and then click the box mentioning I agree to the terms and conditions of Bitstamp.
· Now complete the registration process by clicking on the box that says I am not a robot.
· You will get an email regarding your ID and password with which you can later log in to your portal.
· To begin with the exchange process, you need to click on this link bitstamp.net/account/login and enter your login ID and password.
· You must change your Bitstamp password now. Click on this link bitstamp.net/account/change_password to do the same.
· Log out of the current session and login again using the ID and the new password for the final verification process.
· You will get the option of verification, click on it to verify your account.
Once you have created the account and verified it, you are ready to start using it.
Steps to start trading on Bitstamp:
  1. After verification, you need to deposit funds to start trading.
  2. Transfer funds via your preferred deposit method
  3. Choose the desired market from the upper left corner of your account
  4. Choose the type of order you want to place and enter the cryptocurrency amount you wish to purchase and place a buy order via the Buy and Sell page.
  5. You can also buy cryptocurrencies supported by Bitstamp using Visa or Mastercard credit or debit card.
Concluding thoughts- This information would have given you insight into how to trade using Bitstamp. Make sure that you run through each step carefully before beginning your crypto trading journey.
For more such interesting information, keep coming back to Blockchain Council, a leading platform for Blockchain certification programs.
submitted by Blockchain_org to BlockchainStartups [link] [comments]

Bitstamp (Ripple Gateway) Trade Volume and Market Listings | CoinMarketCap Hello, friends. Can someone explain what this page represents at Bitstamp exchange please?

Bitstamp (Ripple Gateway) Trade Volume and Market Listings | CoinMarketCap Hello, friends. Can someone explain what this page represents at Bitstamp exchange please? submitted by Markus-H to Ripple [link] [comments]

Bitstamp and withdrawal fees

Bitstamp currently cover the cost of transaction fees with cryptos to wallets/other exchanges. Why not support a feeless/instant crypto and help with adoption while also saving money? If you would add Nano as an option would you would become the cheapest onramp for europeans to use binance. Binance currently has no euro pairs but surely bitstamp is worried if this is to occur? I for one use bitstamp as an onramp and then withdraw the funds to binance but will quickly leave if a better option arises - Atleast with a nano pair it would be quick to send between exchanges (3secs to binance) and would deter people from re-doing KYC for a whole new exchange
submitted by Quansword to BitstampOfficial [link] [comments]

Complicated but I found a way to cash out.

Initially I bought Ethereum, Ripple (xrp), Cardano and Stellar Lumens.
Wanted to cash out.
Couldn't find a way to do it in the app.
Accidentally sold my ethereum, which i believed was being converted to USD then I could transfer it to my bank account. Accidentally bought USMD or something instead and realized it was just another crypto that couldn't be cashed out via the app. So I sold that into more ripple. So at this point I owned just Ripple, Cardano and Stellar.
Eventually messed around with bitstamp and realized it was a painful process as well. Not really optimized for US customers.
Converted everything to Ripple. Tried to cash that out, failed.
Converted Ripple to Bitcoin in Crypto.com. Deposited it into Cash app. Sold it on cash app. Cashed out on cash app and the money appeared in my bank account.
All in all it was a 3 hour process. But if I were to do it again I think it would take 15 minutes.
So There is a legit way to cash out. When your ready, transfer your coins into bitcoin, transfer them to your cash app wallet, sell on cash app. Cash out on cash app and the money will be back in your bank account.
Obviously it would be ideal if we could just sell our coins and deposit them back into our bank account through the app. But I guess they'll get there in time.

I'm a big fan of ripple and ethereum, I feel like they have a high ceiling and haven't peaked yet. In retrospect I like cardano and stellar but they seem a little niche.
submitted by mythicgamingent to Crypto_com [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Bitstamp may launch trading Ethereum Classic, Zcash and Stellar

Bitstamp, one of the first European cryptocurrency exchanges, is considering listing Ethereum Classic (ETC), Stellar Lumens (XLM), Zcash (ZEC), Basic Attention Token (BAT), Paxos Standard (PAX), USD Coin (USDC) and 0x (ZRX).
The platform’s specialists will thoroughly study the technical characteristics of these cryptocurrencies, as well as their compliance with the security requirements of the exchange and the legislation of some countries. It is worth noting that Bitstamp is extremely cautious about listing coins. Currently, only five crypto assets are traded on the platform: Bitcoin, Ethereum, XRP, Litecoin and Bitcoin Cash.
submitted by bestchange_pr to bestchange [link] [comments]

Daily Ripple/XRP Discussion Thread 07/16/17

Hello! It's Sunday. Welcome to our daily discussion thread. Put your commentary in here.
We'll probably add more to the body of these threads, but for now, just go read the rules: https://www.reddit.com/Ripple/wiki/rules
Also, make sure to report any comments or posts that don't follow the rules!
submitted by AutoModerator to Ripple [link] [comments]

Allright, who of you did this :D

Allright, who of you did this :D submitted by kdekleva to Ripple [link] [comments]

Exchanges and XRP-Fiat pairs

The roots of this go back to a poster who, some days ago, suggested an exchange dedicated to XRP alone. It was quickly shot down, but it may not be a bad idea.
One of the hurdles to XRP adoption by banks/businesses is converting XRP to fiat. Right now, you can buy XRP with a few fiat currencies, but a lot is done with bitcoin as an on/off ramp. Moreover, to the best of my knowledge, of the XRP-fiat pairs, there is not a single exchange that one can use to access all of these pairs, so any institution (or market maker) is forced to open and maintain accounts on a lot of exchanges. It would make sense to have a single exchange these institutions can turn to, and we may see some news on this front during the conference (or at least I hope we do). If we don't, setting up an exchange with lots of XRP-fiat pairs is probably a good idea, and will not only increase XRP use in the crypto community by providing an alternative (and possibly more stable) on-ramp to the typical BTC/ETH entry point, but also increase XRP trading volume.
Of course, I could be wrong and this may be an non-issue, but it is something worth considering.
submitted by thow_away_accnt to Ripple [link] [comments]

Ripple Subreddit Rules, Helpful Links & Answers to Common Questions - READ BEFORE POSTING

You must read our rules before participating in Ripple
Helpful links and answers to common questions will be updated frequently so check back often
 
 
Ripple Subreddit Rules
https://www.reddit.com/Ripple/wiki/rules
 
Helpful Links
Ripple Insights - Top 9 Frequently Asked Questions About Ripple and XRP (Jan 18, 2018)
Ripple’s Ultimate Strategy; why XRP will increase in value
Removing inefficiency of international payments with XRP
Reasons to expect XRP to be the most popular bridge asset
"XRP is competitive now in the USD/MXN corridor"
Ripple's Decentralization Strategy Update
XRP Market Performance
List of Ripple Partnerships and RippleNet Implementations
 
People to Follow
Ripple on Twitter
Brad Garlinghouse, Chief Executive Officer at Ripple
Yoshitaka Kitao, executive chairman, CEO and president of SBI Holdings, Inc.
David Schwartz, Chief Cryptographer at Ripple | aka u/sjoelkatz
Stefan Thomas, Former CTO at Ripple, Co-creator of Interledger. Founder at Coil
Patrick Griffin, Senior Vice President of Business Development at Ripple
Miguel Vias, Head of XRP Markets at Ripple
Warren Paul Anderson, Product Manager, xRapid/XRP at Ripple
 
Hodor's XRP Blog
TplusZero - research & analysis on #XRP
 
Most Discussed Topics and Answers
● The Case Against BankCoin - Banks need an independent digital asset to enable truly efficient settlement
● Ripple Technology → Fast Payments → XRP → Fast Settlement
● Solving the chicken and egg problem - FI's bridging payments with XRP & companies saving money by holding XRP
● Banks hold XRP under a contractual agreement | Build liquidity to bridge payments to raise the demand for XRP
● How the global adoption of xRapid (XRP liquidity tool) would affect the value of XRP
● Besides instant cross-border payment settlement, XRP can capture other use cases, value that doesn't yet exist
● XRP Ledger has numerous technological advantages over blockchain systems that use proof of work
● Ripple is committed to making the XRP Ledger as decentralized as they possibly can
● Quantum-resistant signature schemes - Adding a new scheme is easy and fast
 
XRP Wallets
You need 20 XRP to activate a XRP wallet. Fees can be changed by the validators through the voting process.
The reserve requirement protects the XRP Ledger from spam or malicious usage.
 
When you are sending XRP to an exchange, destination tag is very important.
Destination tag is not needed when you transfer XRP to your own wallet address.
 
● XUMM by XRPL Labs | Developers
XUMM is a free app (iOS and Android) that makes sending, receiving and interacting with the XRP ledger easy & secure.
 
● Ledger Nano S | Tutorial | FAQ | Buy Online | Ripple Recovery Tool
Cryptocurrency Hardware Wallet
When you get your Ledger wallet, you must reset it and get a new set of 24 words seed before using it.
 
● The World Exchange | How to Create a Cold Wallet for Ripple
A free user-friendly and purely client-side wallet
 
● GateHub | Support | Network Statistics
GateHub XRP Web Wallet
 
Tools
Check XRP wallet balance - Bithomp | Graph | Transactions
Print raw information about an account, a transaction or a ledger - RPC Tool
 
Exchanges
The best way to support XRP is to buy/sell XRP directly with your local currency, not with USDT, ETH, LTC, or BTC.
Available XRP pairs - AUD, BRL, CAD, CNY, EUR, GBP, IDR, INR, JPY, KRW, MXN, PHP, RUB, THB, TRY, UAH, USD, ZAR.
You can find the complete list of XRP exchanges and supported XRP/fiat pairs Here.
 
USD - US Dollar
Kraken | Bitstamp | Bitfinex | CEX.IO | Gatehub |
Exrates | Exmo | Mr. Exchange | Bitsane | Sistemkoin | BitBay | Quoine
 
EUR - Euro
Kraken | Bitstamp | Gatehub | CEX.IO | LiteBit.eu | Anycoin Direct
The Rock Trading | Bitsane | BitBay | BitFlip | Bitlish | Quoine
 
KRW - South Korean Won
Bithumb | Upbit | Coinone | Korbit | GOPAX | Coinrail
 
JPY - Japanese Yen
Kraken | Bitbank | Quoine | Mr. Exchange
 
CNY - Chinese Yuan
RippleFox | Ripple China | Fatbtc
 
TRY - Turkish Lira
Vebitcoin | BTCTurk | Koineks | Sistemkoin | Ovis
 
INR - Indian Rupee
Zebpay | Koinex | Unocoin | Bitbns | BuyBitcoin | BuyUcoin
 
AUD - Australian Dollar
BTC Markets
 
THB - Thai Baht
BX Thailand
 
MXN - Mexican Peso
Bitso
 
IDR - Indonesian Rupiah
Indodax | Quoine
 
RUB - Russian Ruble
Exmo | BitFlip
 
ZAR - South African Rend
Altcoin Trader
 
CAD - Canadian Dollar
Kraken
 
UAH - Ukrainian Hryvnia
Kuna | BTC Trade UA | BitFlip
 
GBP - British Pound
Cryptomate
 
BRL - Brazilian Real
Braziliex
 
SGD - Singapore Dollar
Quoine
 
AED - United Arab Emirates Dirham
BitOasis
 
PHP - Philippine peso
CX | Exchange
 
USDT - Tether
Poloniex | Bittrex | Huobi | OKEx | CoinBene | Upbit | HitBTC |
ZB.com | Gate.io | Sistemkoin
 
ETH - Ethereum
Binance | Bittrex | Gatehub | OKEx | OTCBTC | Upbit | HitBTC |
Bitsane | Mr. Exchange | CoinFalcon
 
LTC - Litecoin
Bitsane | Mr. Exchange
 
BTC - Bitcoin
Kraken | Bitstamp | Bitfinex | CEX.IO | Gatehub | Binance | Poloniex | Bittrex |
HitBTC | OKEx | Upbit | Huobi | BTCTurk | BTC Markets | CoinEgg | Exmo |
ZB.com | OTCBTC | Coinrail | Bits Blockchain | Triple Dice Exchange | Indodax |
Exrates | Qryptos | Gate.io | Bitsane | Bitso | Ovis | BCEX | BitBay |
Mr. Exchange | Orionx | CoinFalcon | Abucoins | BitFlip | LakeBTC | Coinbe
submitted by nvok to Ripple [link] [comments]

Is there any use in forking the Ripple source code, getting rid of all of the bullshit, and setting it up as a decentralized currency exchange?

No pre-mined XRP cryptocurrency, no fungible IOUs that "ripple" through by default, no "rippling" at all, no OpenCoin controlling the validator nodes, etc. Just ditch all of it.
It's never going to compete with Bitcoin, but it'll definitely compete with the Gox trading engine, that's for damn sure.
submitted by MauledByPorcupines to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to ethtrader [link] [comments]

#6 lessons for newcomers: My 1 year XRP journey. Fundamentals, FOMO, FUD & Greed on the path to $5 and beyond.

6 crucial things I learned in 2017.

 
As I find it difficult to share this story with friends and family so I turn to this community. They either don’t understand or think everything that sounds like crypto is a bubble.
 
Also I hope that this story might help others to avoid the mistakes I made.
 
TLDR: * I fundamentally believe in XRP and ~10x’ed my FIAT so far (compared to $), * Could have 15x’ed if I would have not have made emotional decisions based on greed, fomo and FUD, * Make rules for yourself and stick to them. Period, * I will buy XRP till $5, * Bitstamp is a great exchange but at some point definitely secure your holdings with some level of paranoia.
 
This story is about my personal journey on the XRP train. A story about fundamental analysis, FOMO (fear of missing out), FUD (fear uncertainty and doubt), my greed, emotional trading, belief in XRP and patience.
 
My journey started with bitcoin actually in ~ 2013. I had this friend who kept talking about this bitcoin that will change the world.
 
It was around $600 at the time, I told him he was crazy and it was a bubble, without even researching it I waved his words away.
 
The higher BTC rose, the more effort I made to tell him it was a bubble and it would crash.
 
At some point it did, after reaching ~1200 or so. Major crash.
I was right!
 
In ~ 2014 I had to buy a few BTC to perform a transaction on a infamous dark web market place that is no longer.
 
After that, I forgot about bitcoin and crypto currencies….
 
Fast forward to January 2017. Crypto is on my radar again, it’s still there…
 
I start reading and following the rapid growth of BTC until April 2017. I don’t understand BTC craze. Of course, it was the first, the tech is revolutionary but there are some problems for me;
 
 
Also I found out about this ‘other thing’, XRP.
 
The more I read the more I believe in the fundamentals;
 
I soon figure out this crucial part:
If banks adopt Ripple’s software and later XRP as a bridge for international transfers they will likely need to purchase XRP to execute these transfers
 
If banks for example need to send $10 Billion, there needs to be sufficient liquidity in the XRP market for such a large USD amount to flow through XRP.
 
In May 2017, XRP is 0.22 USD with a market cap of ~ 9 Billion USD.
How the hell will banks be able to send large amounts of FIAT through XRP without causing massive price swings?
 
They cannot. I figured that if banks were going to use XRP to send let’s say USD 1 trillion on a daily basis XRPs unit price would need to be WAAAYY higher.
 
Let’s Imagine 75% of the coins is being held and not actively trading. 25% of the total supply is being traded on a daily basis. For 1 trillion USD to pass through that 25% should be at least valued at 1 Trillion USD. But likely higher because everyone involved in this want a stable price.
 
I thought that if Ripple succeeds and banks adopt Ripple’s software, it is likely that Ripple will convince banks to use XRP as well.
 
Betting on Ripple the company I believed that XRP was massively undervalued at .22 USD, especially in comparison with coins such as BTC, LTC and some others.
 
After reading up on Ripple and XRP for 2 months straight I decided to buy in for 20% of my net worth (yes, huge gamble and not recommended).
 
I buy Bitcoin at a local broker with a ~4% spread and send the BTC to Bitstamp. Upon arrival on Bitstamp a few hours later I realise that some of my BTC is missing. High transaction fees and a relatively big spread between the broker’s price and the price on bitstamp I find out later.
 
I told myself to hold XRP for 5 years.
 
This is how my journey goes after that:
 
At this point I am still high in profits (could be more if I did not sell though..)
 
 
As of now I feel very happy with 10x gains on the total FIAT amount I put in. However I also feel stupid for not sticking to my plan of holding XRP for 5 years without trading. If I had stuck to my plan I would have been up 15x by now.
 
My new plan:
 
I learned some things:
 
Hopefully this story might be of some use.
 
To all /Ripple'ers, big thanks; especially to those answering questions from newcomers and to those keeping thus sub high quality and free of memes and other low quality posts.
 
Wishing everyone a great start of 2018 and happy holding!
submitted by Muggeman to Ripple [link] [comments]

Why has got Ripple a marketcap of 500 million USD and I hear nobody talking about Ripple at all ?

submitted by webitthedust to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

New Ripple Giveaway - MASSIVE price drop

from ripple (mail):
Upcoming: Ripples for Email List and Developers May 10, 2013
It has been quite a month for math-based currencies. There has been a flood of new interest so we have doubled our efforts to keep up with the rising tide. We are overdue with some important updates, but the time has come.
Announcing....
At the end of May, we will begin a ripple (aka XRP) giveaway to everyone who signed up for our email list on or before May 9, 2013. Tens of thousands of folks will be getting ripples! We will be distributing ripples for this giveaway in batches. Everyone who is eligible will receive their giveaway email by the end of the month.
Thereafter, we will start a Developer XRP Giveaway. This giveaway will be designed specifically for software developers with the goal of introducing the Ripple protocol to them. If you are a coder interested in our developer programs, we recommend you subscribe to our developer email list and follow us on Github.
If you have more questions or want to chat with us, you can always find us in the Ripple forum or on Twitter.
Thanks!
From the Blog
Security Tip #1 - Don't share your Secret Key
ABOUT OPENCOIN AND RIPPLE
Ripple is an open p2p payments network that is primarily developed and maintained by OpenCoin Inc.
submitted by xrp_Giveaway to ripplers [link] [comments]

XRP only top 4 coin gaining on Bitcoin

Hey all, Just an observation I noticed. XRP appears to be the only top 4 coin (BTC, ETH, XRP, LTC) to be gaining on XRP for the last 4 months, according to Bitstamp.
This is, to me, is more important than XRP/USD. It shows that we're ripping off the bandaid of being coupled to bitcoin.
submitted by rockumsockumrobots to XRP [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to bitcoin_uncensored [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to btc [link] [comments]

Market Analysis: Bitcoin (BTC) Drops Below Critical $3,900 Level, All Major Cryptocurrencies Down More Than 10%, Ethereum (ETH), Bitcoin Cash (BCH), Litecoin (LTC), EOS, Cardano (ADA), IOTA, and Monero (XMR) Down 15 Percent

Market Analysis: Bitcoin (BTC) Drops Below Critical $3,900 Level, All Major Cryptocurrencies Down More Than 10%, Ethereum (ETH), Bitcoin Cash (BCH), Litecoin (LTC), EOS, Cardano (ADA), IOTA, and Monero (XMR) Down 15 Percent

https://preview.redd.it/jvwd96r80n921.png?width=690&format=png&auto=webp&s=8081d2134bc187cfb38cc005ae811e0d8cd5756f
https://cryptoiq.co/market-analysis-bitcoin-btc-drops-below-critical-3900-level-all-major-cryptocurrencies-down-more-than-10-ethereum-eth-bitcoin-cash-bch-litecoin-ltc-eos-cardano-ada-iota-and-monero/
Bitcoin (BTC) has dropped $430 (11 percent) to $3,590, placing it well below the critical $3,900 level. $3,900 has been the level to watch since that was the price of Bitcoin when the December futures contract expired on CME and is likely the level where CME Bitcoin futures traders took out their positions for the month.
Bitcoin (BTC) has faced stiff resistance at the $3,900 level multiple times this month but managed to go above it the past few days after a short squeeze, which was likely caused by Bitfinex temporarily closing down for server migration. Now, however, Bitcoin (BTC) is back below this key level.
This suggests that CME Bitcoin futures traders largely went short for January. A past Crypto.IQ article details how CME Bitcoin futures expiration dates have a strong connection to Bitcoin’s price behavior.

Image courtesy Bitcoinwisdom.com. Top is Bitcoin price in USD on Bitstamp, bottom is volume in Bitcoins. White line is $3,900 level.
Although this is the biggest Bitcoin (BTC) price plunge yet of 2019, several other major cryptocurrencies are doing worse and are down more than 15 percent including Ethereum (ETH), Bitcoin Cash (BCH), Litecoin (LTC), Cardano (ADA), IOTA, EOS, and Monero (XMR).
This breaks a month-long rally for Ethereum (ETH), Tron (TRX), and Litecoin (LTC), which saw gains of 90 percent, 165 percent, and 75 percent respectively before today’s price drop. Ethereum (ETH) had been rallying on speculation regarding the Constantinople hard fork, coming less than a week from now, since the fork will lower the Ethereum inflation rate by slashing block rewards from three ETH to two ETH. There will also be several new features implemented such as better developer tools and lower transaction fees.
The slashing of block rewards and the decision to implement ProgPoW which makes ASICs far less efficient may cause a battle between Ethereum miners and developers. Crypto.IQ speculated that the Ethereum (ETH) Constantinople fork could result in similar tension to the Bitcoin Cash (BCH) fork in November 2018.
If this prediction is accurate, a crash in Ethereum’s (ETH) price may ensue. Perhaps the amplified Ethereum (ETH) price drop overnight is due to uncertainty about what will happen when the Constantinople fork launches in less than a week.
Notably, Ripple (XRP) has now taken the number two spot on CoinMarketCap since Ripple (XRP) is “only” down 10 percent today while Ethereum (ETH) is down 15 percent.
Dogecoin (DOGE) has shown resilience today and is only down seven percent. It has been observed that Dogecoin (DOGE) is less severely impacted by broad price drops in the crypto-space. This is possibly due to Dogecoin (DOGE) having a strong community and simultaneously not being a common choice for speculators.
Many more cryptocurrencies than those mentioned in this analysis are down 10 percent or more, and $15.5 billion (11.2 percent) was slashed from the total crypto market cap overnight. Currently, the total crypto market cap is $123 billion, which is still well above the bear market low of $100 billion that we saw during mid-December 2018 when Bitcoin (BTC) hit $3,120 on Bitstamp.
It is too soon to say a bottom is in for the crypto market, and if short sellers on CME really are in control this month, as data suggests, then it is possible Bitcoin (BTC) will decline further this month. A re-testing of bear market lows near $3,100 is not out of the question.
submitted by turtlecane to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Need to get started. Will offer bitcoins for ripple.

I can give 0.05 BTC for 300 Ripple. They don't make it easy to get started do they?
submitted by big00daddy to ripplers [link] [comments]

KCN: Bitstamp продает токены Ripple XRP Ripple XRP/USD/Bitstamp See the history of cryptocurrency! Crypto chart How to deposit XRP to Bitstamp KCN: Bitstamp trades Ripple's XRP tokens XRP to USD, convert Ripple to US Dollar or other currencies

Real-Time Bitstamp BTC/USD Bitcoin to US Dollar Market Charts. BTC USD (Bitcoin / US Dollar) This is the most popular Bitcoin pair in the world. Bitcoin uses peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority or banks; managing transactions and the issuing of Bitcoins is carried out collectively by the network. Bitcoin is open-source; its design is public, nobody owns or controls this cryptocurrency and everyone can take part. Bitcoin price grew ... About Bitstamp Founded in 2011, Luxembourg-based Bitstamp is a leading digital asset exchange and the largest Bitcoin exchange in the EU in volume terms. Currently offering trading pairs of USD and EUR with BTC, the exchange is set to include XRP in January 2017, and this is to be followed by other trading pairs and products in the coming ... About XRP. Originally conceived in 2012 as a Real-Time Gross Settlement (RTGS) system aimed to reduce overheads while transacting from one currency to other, XRP has grown to be one of the most used cryptocurrencies in the world, with its market cap only second to Bitcoin at more than $121 billion, as of January 6th,2018. Informieren Sie sich über die neuesten Ideen und Prognosen für XRP / Bitcoin von unseren Top-Autoren - sie teilen Vorhersagen und technische Perspektiven des Marktes.

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KCN: Bitstamp продает токены Ripple XRP

Step By Step How To Store XRP in Ledger Nano S Instructions Guide Set Up Cold Wallet Storage TTS - Duration: 9:37. Rose On The Moon 1,794 views This short 2 minute video will help you to learn step by step how to open an account and buy Ripple (XRP) on Bitstamp.net, one of the most popular Ripple exchange. It is possible to send Bitcoin and other assets such as Gold and USD over the XRP Ledger. Thank you to BankXRP for the Chris Larsen video clip. Follow BankXRP on Twitter at https://twitter.com ... This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue. Watch Queue COINSPRO BASIC TRADING XRP to PHP TUTORIAL 2019 TAGALOG, coins.ph coinsph coins ph, mobile version - Duration: 25:02. Bitcoin atbp Pinas Tube Recommended for you 25:02

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